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Innovative Asian Entrepreneurs

Meet the Founders of Kaodim

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Choong Fui-yu is the co-founder & CEO of Kaodim.com, the leading marketplace for local services – from plumbers, photographers, cleaners, wedding planners and many more. Kaodim was born in Malaysia and has expanded into Singapore and the Philippines, with the rest of South East Asia coming soon.

Before working on Kaodim, Fui spent 6 years as a corporate and commercial litigation lawyer. He’s a builder at heart and works day and night building Kaodim into an impactful business, with the hope of bringing positive change to the services industry and everyone in it. He’s passionate about big ideas and value creation through business and entrepreneurship.

Jeffri Cheong is the co-founder & Managing Director of Kaodim.com. He was a litigation lawyer specializing in intellectual property and commercial arbitration with a leading international law firm prior to starting Kaodim. This is his first business venture in an environment that is completely different from the litigation courtroom. He decided to leave his career as a lawyer behind, leap into the wild, unpredictable world of entrepreneurship, learn everything about building a business from scratch and challenge himself to building a regional tech start-up that can change the lives of millions.

In your own words what is Kaodim?

Choong Fui-yu:

A bunch of highly committed people collectively working towards a common goal of helping people with things they care about most (whether it’s the plumbing or renovation of their home, or a photography session for their wedding) and to empower businesses with growth, innovation and progress.

Jeffri Cheong:

Imagine you have a leak in your house, what would you do? You’ll probably ask your friends or family for recommendations for a plumber. Often this plumber may be unavailable, unqualified, and too expensive for the job. Often you end up disappointed, wishing there was a faster, more reliable solution. Kaodim allows you to tell us your specific problem using your mobile phone, computer or any device. Within minutes or hours you’ll get matched with qualified and verified service professionals like plumbers, electricians, cleaners and much more who will provide you with a custom quote to fix your problem. You can compare business profiles, read reviews from customers who’ve used them in the past, communicate with them through our app and pick the service provider who best suits your requirements. Kaodim provides an effective solution to a pain point which millions of people go through every day.

How did you come up with the idea of Kaodim?

Choong Fui-yu:

For me, at the beginning I really just wanted to build a company – but a company whose business and way of doing business added great value to a big part of society. There was a huge void in local services and we felt that there was so much that could be done to make things better for both the consumer and the service providers.

So we did a lot of research and saw a few business models that worked and others that didn’t work in other places around the world. That’s when we came upon thumbtack.com, which is a local services marketplace in the US from which Kaodim’s initial idea was emulated from.

We felt that the model where we could match both the consumers and service providers through a quick and convenient platform was something that would solve the problems often encountered in service related transactions – for the consumers, the value Kaodim provides comes in the form of a quick and easy way to get connected to and receive price quotations from service providers who understand your specific needs and in addition, read reviews from other consumers who have used those service providers in the past. This way, consumers no longer have to waste precious time searching for the service providers. They also get several quotes to compare prices from. The profiles, ratings and reviews left by other consumers who have used the services of a particular service provider also give them a clear idea of who they’re hiring for the job and what they can expect in terms of quality.

As for the service providers, Kaodim is the fastest and easiest way for them to grow their businesses. Instead of having to spend time and money marketing and reaching out to new customers, Kaodim quickly matches them with people who are looking for their services. In addition, the service providers get to decide who they respond to and whether the job requested for is within their capability and convenience. So it’s a quick, easy and also very sustainable service because they are empowered with choice and flexibility like never before.

As a platform, Kaodim provides a lot of added value in the form of the trust and transparency that we spend a lot of time cultivating. We believe that this trust and transparency promotes better quality all round and ultimately, elevates service levels.

Jeffri Cheong:

We wanted to bring mobile technology into an industry which has seen very little innovation since the beginning of time. Service providers’ likes photographers, cleaners; plumbers still relied on flyers and referrals to get customers even though they were online on their phones or computers all the time. We wanted to build something that allowed them harness this technology to get clients rapidly, just like how Myteksi has given taxi drivers more customers than they had before.

We also wanted to solve the pain points that millions in Southeast Asia have with respect to hiring service providers that had a sometimes unfounded stigma of being unprofessional, unresponsive and delivered poor quality work. Through Kaodim thousands of businesses have transformed using this technology in a short period of time and the general standards or service quality among professionals in Malaysia has increased through the dynamic ecosystem we have created which encourages them to deliver better service for their customers every day.

Could you walk us through the process of starting up Kaodim?

Choong Fui-yu:

Jeff and I were both still practicing lawyers when we first started Kaodim. We ideated for a short while and started with a very simple single page website to test the whole model. Everything was done manually and we didn’t build anything or buy anything. We just tested the model and made sure it worked. When we started getting good traction we realised we were on to something big. That there was a real problem worth solving and that our solution was something people needed and loved. That’s when we decided to work on Kaodim full time.

Did you encounter any particular difficulties during startup?

Choong Fui-yu:

We were lawyers and had no particular expertise outside of that except our wits and judgment. Everything had to be learned from scratch, from digital marketing, operations, tech & product, everything. We overcame it by being really open to everything and importantly, always reminding ourselves that we had a lot to learn. Necessity is the mother of all invention – and that’s very true because we had pretty much nobody to help us. We had to figure it all out ourselves but we put in a lot of hard work and managed.

Jeffri Cheong:

We encountered many challenges such as educating the market on this new service, figuring how to persuade people to use the product, maintaining the quality of our service providers and capturing the trust of our users. We had to be resourceful, think on our feet, act quickly, work hard and focus on our vision of building a quality product that can give true value to millions of people.

What kind of feedback did you get for Kaodim so far?

Jeffri Cheong:

Tens of thousands of Malaysians alone have hired service providers on Kaodim and have had excellent experiences. Testaments to this are the high ratings and positive reviews customers have left on all the service providers they’ve hired. Some service providers have made 400 new customers in just a few months from using kaodim. Some of them had hundreds of jobs at the end of a year before using Kaodim, but after 8 months or so of using Kaodim, they had thousands of jobs.

Many people who tried Kaodim to get a cleaner or electrician continue to use Kaodim again to hire professionals for the same service, or other services. This is likely due to the excellent experience they had with the platform and the dedicated customer service team we have to make sure everything goes well from the moment they submit a request until the conclusion of their project.

What is your strategy against your competition?

Choong Fui-yu:

There will always be competition in anything worth doing. Our strategy against competition is not to look at what our competition is doing, but what we can do better.

Jeffri Cheong:

Kaodim provides more leads to small businesses for them to get new customers compared to any other platform out there. This is according to our service providers who rely on Kaodim solely for new customers. The general sentiment among our investors and loyal service providers is that Kaodim is the market leader. We focus on continuing to enhance our product to give both our service providers and people looking for services the best experience possible. We focus on making sure that the quality of our service providers is high and we give our customers the opportunity to hire hundreds of different services from roof repair to new-born photography at the best, most competitive prices without compromising on quality.

Have you developed any industry insights that you could share?

Choong Fui-yu:

The services industry has its own nuances, and there is a general perception in Malaysia (and in the rest of SEA as well) that service quality is low. What we’ve found is that there’s often just a lot of misunderstanding and lack of proper communication and understanding between customers and service providers, rather than a simple lack of quality or low service quality. There isn’t a simple and convenient way for people for looking for services to state specifically what they need and be able to meet qualified service providers who can meet those exact needs. That’s what Kaodim is about and that’s one of the reasons why it has gotten the success that it has. What we’re also happy to see is that by paying close attention to vetting and pre-screening service providers, managing them through reviews, merit and demerit systems, we don’t just get the best providers on the platform but more than that, we create an ecosystem where people are rewarded for giving good service. Eventually, as we have seen quite clearly, this leads to an overall improvement in service quality. We’re really excited in creating this ecosystem across SEA.

What is the future of the industry and how do you plan to stay relevant in this industry?

Choong Fui-yu:

Like any other business, it’s a question of value. Give value and you will always be relevant.

Jeffri Cheong:

The services industry is a billion dollar one and it is here to stay for a long time. Kaodim will continue to expand its high value marketplace to match people with thousands of other professional service providers and grow those who provide those services along the way.

What do you think about being an entrepreneur in Asia?

Jeffri Cheong:

There is tremendous opportunity to build tech focused solutions in Southeast Asia- a 600 million strong market that is dying for innovation and change. There are many challenges about doing business in SEA such as the fragmented economies, markets and cultures of each country. But if you navigate the differences well to build a localized business in every country you’ll be alright. That is why we focus heavily on localization. We are called Kaodim.sg in Singapore, Kaodim.com to appeal to Singaporeans and Malaysians who understand what the word Kaodim represents. But we are called Gawin.ph in the Philippines which means “get it done” in Tagalog to appeal to that market. We also have local teams in each country we operate in so we can really relate to our customers in each market.

What is your opinion on Asian entrepreneurship vs Western entrepreneurship?

Choong Fui-yu:

I wouldn’t define entrepreneurship as being Asian or Western, except to say generally that the idea of entrepreneurship and the efforts made and taken there are obviously more advanced. But ultimately I think it’s all relative – entrepreneurship is about solving big problems in innovative ways that are a much better than what’s already out there. Whatever problems there are in Asia or the West are problems all the same, so sophistication and methods are not quite as important as understanding the culture and people in the market or country that you are operating in.

What is your definition of success?

Choong Fui-yu:

Honestly I don’t have one. I want what everyone wants, I just want more. But if I have to put it in words, I’d say that success is not a single tangible thing – it’s a continuous pursuit of happiness, however you define it at any given time of your life.

Jeffri Cheong:

If you are able to develop good systems and habits for yourself and stick to them on a daily basis you’ll be successful. If you’re able to find peace, contentment while continuously learning and developing yourself that’s already success.

Why did you decide to become an entrepreneur?

Choong Fui-yu:

I never thought of becoming an entrepreneur. I just wanted to build a company that provided great value and had positive impact to a great number of people.

Jeffri Cheong:

Entrepreneurship allows me to effectively channel my creativity, enthusiasm, ideologies and values every single day and seeing tangible result from it. I have to live with the anxiety, risks and consequences that come with it but it makes me feel truly alive- able to experience the variety of challenges and adventures that life is able to offer.

In your opinion, what are the keys to entrepreneurial success?

Choong Fui-yu:

Being curious and always having the drive to learn more, see more, do more. And constantly reinventing yourself to get better and never being satisfied.

Jeffri Cheong:

Exercising good judgment, listening to people, following advice, working diligently, being industrious and putting your customers ahead of anything else.

Any parting words of wisdom for entrepreneurs out there from your personal experience?

Choong Fui-yu:

Give yourself the time to think about what you really want in life. Decide what it is. Then just go for it.

Jeffri Cheong:

You can’t be a great entrepreneur on your own and you can’t be good at everything. You’ll need to rely on building a team of people who are smarter than you to get you to where you want to be. You will need to invest time in training, mentoring, teaching and making everyone around you feel like they genuinely want to be a part of your journey.

Connect

http://www.kaodim.com/

www.kaodim.sg

http://www.gawin.ph/
www.facebook.com/kaodim

https://www.facebook.com/gawin.ph

www.facebook.com/kaodim.sg

Entrepreneurship

Women on Top in Tech – Anna Gong, CEO of Perx Technologies

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(Women on Top in Tech is a series of Women Founders, CEOs & Leaders in technology. It aims to amplify and bring to the fore diversity in leadership in technology.)

I am talking to Anna Gong, CEO of Perx Technologies, a leading mobile customer engagement and loyalty software company headquartered in Singapore.  Anna was born in China and grew up in the U.S., and has been in the tech industry for nearly 20 years. She has worked at large and startup companies before taking over the leadership of Perx in November 2014.

perx-logo


How did you rise in the industry you are in?

With pure perseverance and an undying passion for success. All because of the fear of letting my parents’ big sacrifice go in vain. They came to the U.S. with $500 and 2 young kids (my sister and me). They sacrificed their careers as established academic and healthcare professionals. I wanted them to be proud and while growing up in the U.S. where it’s full of dreams and hopes. I took on many challenges and tried many things to prove that I can achieve success and greatness but not without hardship, obstacles, and major discrimination challenges.

From the day I graduated from college, I started my career in the tech industry. I have never once let a mostly male-dominated industry discourage me. I also did not let rejection of opportunities discourage me either. I optimistically persevered and even acted like one of the boys to fit in and disguised my femininity at times. I was not afraid to face challenges, push backs and lean into difficult situations. I always knew if I didn’t take those chances, the opportunity would pass me by.

Why did you take on this role/start this startup especially since this is perhaps a stretch or challenge for you? (or viewed as one since you are not the usual leadership demographics.)

I wouldn’t say I wasn’t the usual leadership demographic. There are more and more tech companies being led by females, but it still has ways to go to be on the same level playing field as men.

I was actually recruited into this role by the board and I took it since I knew the mobile technology was a hot area to get into and it was a great business model. However, when I came in, I discovered that this company needed a whole new face lift, an entire shift in the way we did business to ensure we could achieve sustainable and repeatable success.

I therefore “refounded” the company and developed a whole new culture, technology platform, business and service model. You now see a different Perx. Perx 2.0.

Now as a leader how do you spot, develop, keep, grow and support your talent?

This is one of the more common challenges with companies of all sizes. It has to start from the foundational ingredients such as core values and culture. Then it’s leadership and how well you instill and practice ownership, accountability but yet still make it a fun, creative and challenging environment.

Do you consciously or unconsciously support diversity and why?

I now unconsciously support it. I believe in and embrace diversity but at the end of the day, I aim to hire the best person for the role and not the best gender.

What is your take on what it takes to be a great leader in your industry and as a general rule of thumb?

I’m not sure if there’s any single handbook that teaches you to be a great leader but there are things that I believe in and practice. You have to have great vision, strong purpose, and core values that the company can buy into, support, and love by. Focus focus focus and be transparent. Lead from the front line and lead with compassion and empathy.

Advice for others?

Don’t be afraid to fail and seek advice from your community. You cannot do this alone and being a CEO is a lonely job. Find one or a few mentors. This is absolutely essential to our success and our sanity.


To learn more about Perx, please see http://www.getperx.com.

Are you a startup looking for investment? Come join me at Expert Dojo’s “Q4 Investor Festival – Where Startups Meet Investors” in Santa Monica, from October 24 to 28. Details at http://expertdojo.com/events/biggest-startup-pitch-event-usa-5-days-focus-get-startup-funded-investor-festival/.

For information about the first ever “Latinx in Tech Edition”, please see http://www.kaporcenter.org/event/startup-weekend-oakland-latinx-tech-edition/.
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Innovative Asian Entrepreneurs

The Ming Brothers, Founders of The Ming Thing

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We’ve seen you guys all over YouTube but tell us a bit about yourselves.

Ming Han:

My name is Ho Ming Han, but people usually refer to me as just Ming. Currently, I create a lot of online content, act and direct. But I grew up the typical asian child way – studied hard in school and learned piano at the same time. I studied to be an architect since young but when I started the degree, I really learned what passion was and I didn’t have that for the subject. I dropped out and somehow ended up in a Psychology degree, finished it and loved it.

I’ve always appreciated the arts and actually started performing with my brother in a band since we were in high school and college. So when YouTube began for us, it was a new way to express ourselves and let out our creativity as well.

Ming Yue:

And, I’m Ho Ming Yue, or more commonly known as Ming Yue or Ming. One of the Mings from The Ming Thing, I love creating and highlighting the little things in life that we usually tend to oversee. My passions are music, film, tech & gadgets, and people.

In your own words, what do you guys do on YouTube today?

Ming Yue:

I think the easiest way to describe what we do is to call it what it is. Content creators. We make content that we share with people through the internet that hopefully people enjoy and can relate to.

Ming Han:

I would add that my team and myself write, create and produce different forms of content (usually videos) for internet use. Along the way, I get the chance to speak and consult different groups of people about matters related to online and social media as well as creative work in its new forms.

So how tell us about your YouTube story. How did it begin?

Ming Han:

Along my thesis year in my degree (my final year), I randomly decided to vlog about the horrible carpark situation in my university at that time. That required me to start a YouTube channel that I randomly named “dmingthing” because it rhymed with my name and “themingthing” was taken, so I had to use “d” instead.

Amazingly, my first vlog did amazingly well. I had a few thousand views overnight for a totally new channel (which was very very surprising). I tried a two more vlogs and it was at that time I got contacted separately by two different people, Raffi and Bryan. They were both pretty good videographers and both offered to try making videos with me. We shot “Shit Boyfriends Say” and “Alone, Forever” and released them one after the other and even more mind-blowingly, both went viral with more than hundreds of thousand views. A huge level up from the few thousands that the vlogs had.

So we looked at ourselves and said, hey.. this is working out. The rest was pretty much history.

Ming Yue: 

I still remember when I was still in England studying, Ming Han started up the channel to complain about his university’ carpark situation. He made a few more videos and when I came back to Malaysia and I joined him and we started putting all our ideas into little videos on the channel.

We’ve always been storytellers since kids, with pretty imaginative minds, so I think we saw YouTube as a way to bring those ideas and stories to life from inside our heads.

Could you guys tell us about the process setting up and growing your YouTube channel?

Ming Yue:

Ming Han made a vlog, and then some short videos with Raffi & Bryan, and then we started to put in a little more effort in those videos. We made a web-series and then more videos.

I guess the channel’s growth was something that just happened, and not something we focused on. We really just wanted to create.

Ming Han:

Honestly, I can’t really recall a “proper” process of doing all that. We just made videos and made some more videos and kept doing that! We’ve never really concentrated on the growth of the channel because we really just focus on writing and making better videos that we’d like to watch. So it was pretty nice having friends and viewers commenting and saying “Hey, you just passed X number of subscribers!” or “Your video has X views!!!”. Yeah its pretty weird but we get told how our channel is doing. Haha.

Were there any major challenges that came with trying to develop the YouTube channel?

Ming Han:

Definitely. When we started, it was really tough getting the right locations to shoot. Doors weren’t really open to us and we literally didn’t have much money at all to book places. Equipment was also really limited. For the longest time we didn’t even use any lights. But really, overcoming this was all about knowing how to use what you have. If you’re good at being resourceful with what you have and become as skilful as you can with the current setup you have, you can make things happen.

Ming Yue:

Also, Ming Han never had any prior training or knowledge in shooting videos, and so Bryan & Raffi were a big part of the channel, bringing their know-how and experience to the table.

Perhaps some memorable difficulties were that we had very limited resources and man-power, which is something we still face today. But we’ve learnt to make do with what we have, and it’s become something we live by today as well.

Where is all of this going? What can we expect from you guys in the near future?

Ming Han:

Nowadays, its more about developing the types of content we make. We’ve always held to the practice of trying new things. So we always take any chance we get to explore a different way of shooting or a different style or writing. Anything that in turn, develops our skills and abilities as well. All this is to make sure we keep growing to do bigger things in the future, be it 5 years or 15. We definitely wanna make bigger forms of content – TV series or even movies.

What are your thoughts on the Malaysian YouTube scene?

Ming Yue:

We’re in a rather interesting point of growth for YouTube here in Malaysia. We’ve actually got quite a few YouTubers that have been around for a while as well.

I think we need to be more courageous when it comes to getting on YouTube, both for creators and as an audience. There’s a lot of talk as to how our Malaysian entertainment scene isn’t on par as countries in the West, and it’s definitely a personal challenge to see that change. YouTube is rich in diversity in the States, and it’s something our local scene needs as well. Not everyone needs to be a comedy-video maker or short-film maker.

If there are people who want to make music videos, or even videos about growing vegetables, I say do it. Being Asians, it’s our strength and weakness that we’re cautious in the things that we do, and critical if it will be a success. But I think if there’s anything we can do that’s different to Asian culture, is to take a risk. As creators, we need to dive into what we’re doing and believe in it, and as content creators, we do just that; create. And as an audience, we need to be more trusting of our local content and creators. That’s going to be the biggest push that Malaysia needs.

Ming Han: 

I think its very very different. Much younger than the scene in U.S. and very segregated because of how diverse our culture is. Over there its simple and straightforward because everyone communicates in English as their main language. But here, we have all kinds of languages and dialects and cultures. Its tough to make something that caters to everyone! But its a great challenge! Haha!

What are some of the key challenges that Malaysian YouTubers face?

Ming Han:

I would say the general creative culture in the region would be the main challenge. People value and treat creativity very differently here. Its still extremely difficult for new YouTubers to make YouTubing their full-time job. Mainly because its tough making a living for it. So many people just do it on the side or maybe don’t even start at all because its tough. Even we face challenges working with bigger brands and corporations. Its an ongoing hustle trying to help educate and change their perspectives regarding online content and how its different from traditional content (newspapers, TV, radio). But I guess that’s part of how a new scene grows. And I’m thankful to be part of that.

Ming Yue:

A lot of people we’ve spoken to at events and workshops always ask one particular question when we talk about YouTube. It’s, ‘How do I start?’. And there’s really only one answer to that, it’s, JUST start.

Again, maybe because of our Asian culture, we’re a bit more timid, a bit more reserved in many ways. And I think that doesn’t have to be the case on YouTube. We treat YouTube as a playground to do whatever we want to do and can think of, and that’s the thing that the local scene needs to remember. I think that it’s not about the number of views or subscribers, or how viral a video gets or even how big a channel grows, it’s about content. At the end of the day, it’s content that keeps an audience coming back. We need to just put ourselves into what we create, and not worry about the rest of it. That’s probably a challenge in itself.


Many people find your viewers incredibly funny and entertaining, what is your secret recipe to great YouTube videos?

Ming Han:

We always make videos that AT LEAST we find “watchable”. Haha. Our main “standard” would be ‘would we enjoy it?’. I guess that’s the first step to our recipe. But to really get into that, its about being aware to what’s going on around you. Our country is absolutely rich with all kinds of comedy and stories to be told because of how rich our culture and diversity is. Its really about watching and listening to what is happening around you and making a good story out of that. Or making fun of it. Heheh.

Ming Yue:

I don’t think there’s a recipe for great videos, because if there is, we definitely need it.

Ming Han and I are the ones who come up and write the videos and I guess we both have a similar source of inspiration for it, and it’s life. We love seeing something or someone react to life and that’s what we try to put into our videos. It’s the way we react to life in ways we may or may not notice.

We recently learnt that you guys have also started CORE Studios, tell us about it.

Ming Han:

Basically, that’s the entity that we set up to do more formal work and bigger work. TheMingThing on YouTube has become our image and face into the online social media world. CORE would most probably be the engine behind it. In CORE we work on different things at once. Mostly different videos most people don’t see online because they’re for other brands and people. But you can expect a bigger team. CORE is where we get new people into the team, train and shape individuals and then with that bigger manpower – create bigger things.

What are your personal opinions on Malaysian entrepreneurship?

Ming Han:

I personally think Malaysia is a great place to begin any entrepreneurship. Its a comfortable country with affordable-ish living costs. Its not too high-stress in terms of really needing to get a job, but I find our countrymen very laid back compared to many other countries I’ve visited. I think as Malaysians, we’re always looking out for something that can help our people. And that’s what Malaysian entrepreneurship is mainly based on – serving the citizens of this country better. Be it better food, better clothes or better services, I love that its strongly and uniquely based on the needs and wants of our country.

Ming Yue:

I think it’s booming and has a lot more potential than we realize. People are starting to take risks, trying to ride the trends and really just create something for themselves. As a nation, I think it’s only going to get better in the coming years with the amount of great ideas that are coming out from the people.

Why did you guys decide to do what you do?

Ming Yue:

Passion. That’s probably the biggest influencing factor in why we decided, and even still do what we do. We absolutely love what we do and we love seeing the way people respond to it; the good the bad and the ugly.

Ming Han:

I would say that it really chose us, instead of the other way around. It just worked! And kept on working. So we kept doing it! After university ended, I was already getting a few jobs here and there to make videos for telcos and different brands. So instead of applying for a more normal (and secure) job, I decided to try this out for a year with Bryan and Raffi as a real job. And that year kept on extending!

What are your definitions of success?

Ming Han:

I’ve noticed this definition changes from time to time. But right now, its about doing what you do, effectively and excellently. To a point where people can’t deny you’re good at what you do.

Ming Yue:

I think to me, success is being able to step back from whatever you’re doing and be content about it. Not so much because you’ve achieved or completed something, but because you’re able to let go of what you’re doing and look above it, knowing that there’s just so much to be grateful for.

Any parting tips and words of wisdom for entrepreneurs out there?

Ming Han:

Take the leap. Its always a risk, but big things are always scary. I believe the younger you are, the more you should try. Of course, entrepreneurship can start at any age but start young. So you make more mistakes and learn quicker. When you’re able to be more flexible and mouldable. Just go for it.

Ming Yue:

Do it. Really, just do it. The biggest thing holding us back from succeeding, is the fact that we don’t even try. Get out there, ?igure out what you love doing, do it, and love that you’re doing it.

Connect with the Ming Brothers:

TheMingThing – YouTube

The Ming Thing – Facebook

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