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Should You Give Up on your Startup Idea?

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All great startups start off with an idea followed by years of hard work. So how do you evaluate quickly and efficiently whether the idea merits further investment of your time and money? The following article describes the process that we have seen play out with great success for the companies we have been working with over the last 2.5 years.

 

Steps to evaluating your startup idea

Over the last 2.5 years we have worked with a number of founders who have all had a startup idea and needed help in turning it into a valuable business over the 12 months we worked with them. We have refined the first few months into a process that is fairly consistent in its approach (especially for ecommerce and marketplace businesses) and it has proven really effective in assessing whether the idea is going to fly or not over the rest of the year.

1. Stay objective.

All founders fall foul of “Confirmation Bias” to a greater or lesser degree, but it’s really important to understand that in this super early phase you need to be super flexible deciding if this idea is worth pursuing. The worst situation is to end up investing a lot time building a product for a weak idea. Once you move into a phase of execution it becomes harder and harder to change direction so it is far better to be open minded now and alter the idea if a bigger truth comes along in this evaluation phase.

2. Use the Lean Canvas to identify your assumptions

Before we invest in any idea stage companies we ask the founders to create a Lean Canvas (similar to a business model canvas but more designed for startups).  Below is an example of a lean canvas when we first were evaluating Lexoo an online legal marketplace (thanks to the Lexoo team for letting us share this).

Lean Canvas

3. Identify your assumptions

Now that you have filled out the canvas as best as you can, go and find some friends (preferably with some business/startup experience) and on a whiteboard  and draw the following chart.

Assumptions chart

Spend 15 minutes on each of the 9 sections of the canvas and ask yourself what assumptions you have made about the business. Write down all the assumptions and how you would test them on post-it notes and categorise them by how easy they are to test and how critical they are to the business succeeding. Below is an example of a few of Lexoo’s post-it notes on the chart as an example.

Assumptions example

This exercise will give you an ordered list of assumptions and ways you can test them based on importance and ease. We have found that assumptions around whether users want this service or product are usually the most important and can be easily tested through speaking to users to understand their needs. The hardest assumptions to test are often to do with how the business will perform at scale (where market sizing and looking at parallels can help).

4. Test your assumptions around the problem, customers, and existing solutions

All startups are trying to solve a problem/aspiration of some kind. Some problems are clearly felt but for others your potential users may never articulate them clearly (because they didn’t know it was possible to improve on how they are currently doing things).

“Don’t ask your potential users what they want. It’s your job as a founder to figure that out based on your deep understanding of their unmet needs and your knowledge of what is possible”

However, through interviews and observations you should be able to see strong evidence of them struggling to solve their problem or solving it in a way that you know you can significantly improve upon. We recommend interviewing at least 20-40 users of different types in order to do some early validation around the problem, your customers and existing solutions. It is also a great idea to observe people as they try to solve these problems and also to try to solve it yourself using existing solutions. Not only does the process of interviews and observations give you a sense of whether you are onto a good idea and validate your key assumptions around the problem to be solved, but it also will give you a wealth of more nuanced information that will inform your product solution.

“Sometimes I work with founders that are reluctant to invest any time in learning about their potential users before building their product. They usually have a hard time.”

If you don’t see a strong need through this process then you should really think about whether it is a good idea.

5. Testing your unique value proposition and solution

Once you are confident that you are solving a problem the usual next set of assumptions you want to test are whether your target market will respond to your unique value proposition and solution. How you go about testing this depends on the product and business type. For consumer companies we usually create a homepage with a call to action that requires some commitment from the user (however big or small that is) and for more complicated products (Saas or mobile) we have built prototypes and observed users interact with them to understand if we are providing value. For hardware products a lot of companies will run a Kickstarter or Indiegogo campaign to prove need (and get funding for the first production run). Dropbox (a very complicated product) famously used a video to explain what they did to prove their solution was what people wanted. If you are building a homepage test then it is important that it clearly describes what you are offering and that is beautifully presented. Users expectations of consumer products in terms of design are always increasing, so if your product isn’t doesn’t look professional then your users may not engage and you may come to the wrong conclusion. With tools like Strikingly or QuickMVP or a few days from a designer and front-end developer you should have something that looks and feels professional. Below is an example of the homepage that we used with Lexoo that also had a simple form for the users to fill out with what they wanted the lawyer to help them with.

Lexoo homepage test

6. Testing marketing channels

Great startups are created through great products and a relentless focus on growth (and good good unit economics for the most part!). For consumer companies, paid marketing is probably going to be part of the mix so it is important to drive some users to your service to test your proposition to get a baseline of cost and volumes that you can expect from channels like search, facebook or twitter. We usually see CAC to be way higher in the beginning but also see it reduce quite rapidly over the 12 months through campaign and product optimisations. Obviously if it is extremely high then that is a warning signal you should pay attention as your unit economics might not work. Volume is also important as it helps you understand how quickly you will need to invest in offline marketing channels and PR in the early stages. By driving users to your homepage test you will be able to see whether users engage and start to test some assumptions about your marketing strategies.

7a Test value  and revenue in an unscaleable way through a concierge service

Using a concierge style service on top of a thin product is a great way to test the real value you want to provide quickly. You can use manual effort to fill out the steps you one day hope to automate. Not only will you have very happy customers from day one but you will also get a deeper understanding of what you need to build to keep them happy. Marketplaces and ecommerce lend themselves very well to this technique, as do a lot of startups that use intelligent systems to offer a personalised service. Lexoo did this by manually matching lawyers to jobs and sent lawyer profiles to customers via email. Over time they built more product to automate some of the process to get it to scale while keeping the same level of personal service.

“Use the concierge service not only to test you are offering value but also to have more face to face conversations with your users and deepen your understanding of their needs.”

7b Test value using prototypes

For SaaS and more complicated products you will generally need to build more product before you can know if you are providing value. In these cases we prefer testing that value through prototypes. It is not as powerful as the concierge service but you can still learn a lot quickly before committing to building something. Running design sprints is a great way to rapidly test out a product or feature and is a great way for the whole team and customers to provide input.

8 Keep learning more about your customers at all times

This last one really isn’t a specific step in the process but is the underlying principle to what you should be doing while evaluating your idea. In the 4-8 weeks you may spend on this (depending on how well everything goes) you will continue to understand more and more about your users. Be sure to email every customer, give them phone numbers to call you, add live chat on the site and organise user tests (online and in person). It is only through a really deep understanding of your customers that you can then move onto the next phase of building a product that really resonates.

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About the Author

This article was written by  of the Path Forward. The Path Forward was developed by Forward Partners, a VC platform that invests in the best ideas and brilliant people. Forward Partners devised The Path Forward to help their founders validate their ideas, build a product, achieve traction, hire a team and raise follow on funding all in the space of 12 months. The Path Forward is a fantastic startup framework for you to utilise as an early stage founder or operator. The framework clearly defines startup creation as being comprised of three steps. The first step of this framework involves understanding customer’s needs.Nic is Head of PR & communications at Forward Partners. Over the course of a 10 year career in communications, he has working with global brands including Orange, Warner Bros., BBC, and amazon.co.uk.

Callum Connects

Clairine Runtung, Investment Manager of Convergence Ventures

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Early-stage venture capitalist, Clairine Runtung, shares her story and passion for helping build Indonesia’s technology ecosystem. In her role, she helps local entrepreneurs looking to grow their business, while also finding time to coach and mentor young women in venture capital through an organisation she co-founded in early 2017.

What’s your story?
Having lived in 4 different cities within 3 different countries throughout my career working in finance, I had always been drawn to not only numbers but also diversity, people and their stories. When an opportunity came about for me to join a tech VC firm in Jakarta, I jumped at the chance, after working for a number of years in a boutique investment consulting firm, a global asset management firm and a non-profit foundation.

I currently lead the investment team at Convergence Ventures, an Indonesia-based early-stage venture capital fund. My work includes sourcing deals, conducting due diligence, reviewing legal documents and most importantly, working with my colleagues in Investment, HR and Business Development teams to support our founders. My job requires relentless intellectual curiosity, analytical and communication skills, and ultimately passion to help the shaping and building of Indonesia’s tech ecosystem.

Early in 2017, I co-founded a Young Women in VC (renamed SheVC Indonesia in September 2017, as part of the global Pan-Asian SheVC network), focused on networking, mentoring and building a community for junior to mid-level female VCs. Our local membership grew to over 20 people within 6 months, and I personally mentored 3 young women just joining the industry. Aside from tech VC, I am also involved in being a Council for Yayasan Cinta Anak Bangsa, a non-profit organization focusing on youth and education, as well as being a mentor and a judge to a number of local tech startup events and competition. Beginning September, I will be attending Yale School of Management to pursue a 2-year MBA program.

What excites you most about your industry?
The never-ending learning, rapid progress, and people attempting to solve real problems through technology. I cannot wait to see what will unfold within tech-VC space in Indonesia in the next 5-10 years. My team and I think we are following China’s growth trajectory though to get there we need major support from the Government and foreign investors.

What’s your connection to Asia?
I was born and raised in Jakarta, Indonesia. I worked for 2.5 years in Singapore. I was educated in the United States and lived there but I am still very much deeply-rooted in Asia. After grad school, I plan on moving back to Asia for sure.

Favourite city in Asia for business and why?
Jakarta and Singapore for two extremely different reasons.
Jakarta, because the city’s urban challenge actually shapes you to become a resilient hustler. Not to mention the fact that the city has a dynamic tech VC landscape that’s rapidly evolving year by year.
Singapore, because I take pleasure in how efficient, effective and structured the city state is!

What’s the best piece of advice you ever received?
“The only way out is through”
“Leave your mark, build a legacy, no matter how tiny you think it is.”

Who inspires you?
My dad and everyone around me who was not born with silver spoons in their mouth.

What have you just learnt recently that blew you away?
It’s amazing how your body can truly adjust to the power of your mind. I have recently increased the frequency of my Intermittent Fasting routine, from only once a week to twice a week. Essentially, twice in a week I’d fast between 22-24 hours. Though skeptical and challenging at first, after a month, I rarely feel hungry/starving on those two scheduled fasting days. Interestingly, I also feel the most productive at work on days that I am fasting.

If you had your time again, what would you do differently?
Nothing. If there is anything I’d like to tell myself over and over again, is to never regret and to look only forward.

How do you unwind?
Take a hot shower, drink a cup of tea and read a book (I alternate between fiction and non-fiction) or watch videos (I also alternate between entertaining and educating videos). On some days, you can find me winding down over a nice dinner with friends or family.

Favourite Asian destination for relaxation? Why?
Bali, Jogjakarta and Manado. All cities are in Indonesia.
Bali for its beaches, sunshine and the feeling of being surrounded by carefree people. Jogjakarta for its Javanese cultural and heritage. Manado because it’s where my dad was born and where my grandparents live. In my opinion, each city has something different to offer that contributes to my way of relaxing.

Everyone in business should read this book:
The Golden Passport – Duff McDonald

Shameless plug for your business:
Instagram Story and straight up telling friends, acquaintances and even strangers about how awesome the work that I do is.

How can people connect with you?
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/clairineruntung/
Personal email: [email protected]

Twitter handle?
@clairineruntung though I have been inactive for years. I am much more active on LinkedIn these days. Find me on IG @clairineruntung as well.

This interview is part of the ‘Callum Connect’ series of more than 500 interviews

Callum Laing is an entrepreneur and investor based in Singapore. He has previously started,
built and sold half a dozen businesses and is now a Partner at Unity-Group Private Equity and Co-Founder of The Marketing Group PLC. He is the author two best selling books ‘Progressive Partnerships’ and ‘Agglomerate’.

Connect with Callum here:
twitter.com/laingcallum
linkedin.com/in/callumlaing
Download free copies of his books here: www.callumlaing.com

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Rishabh Singhvi & Varun Saraf, Co-Founders of Why Q

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Surprised by the lack of delivery services available for local Singaporean hawker stall foods, Rishabh and Varun started their own delivery service.

What’s your story?
Varun and I moved to Singapore in 2008 and soon turned into foodies. After completing our studies at SMU, we worked in corporate offices in the Singapore CBD for 4 years. Here, we faced the problem of long queues and found it hard to find feasible delivery options on a day to day basis. We made it our goal to help others like us, so they don’t face the same problem of finding affordable yet tasty options to eat their daily meal. The name asks all those queuing up at food courts and hawker centres a simple question – Why Queue … when we can bring Singapore’s favorite hawker food to you?

What excites you most about your industry?
The Hawker culture is the most exciting and intriguing part of the food industry in Singapore. It is deep-rooted in the local Singapore culture. There is rich variety of cuisines available under one roof, food is delicious and very affordable. We were very surprised how this part of the food industry was completely ignored by other food deliveries.

What’s your connection to Asia?
I was born and brought up in India and have been staying in Singapore for the past 10 years.

Favourite city in Asia for business and why?
The ease of running a start-up and the professionalism makes Singapore my favourite city for business. It has the most business-friendly regulations, low start-up costs and takes only a week to register and get your business going.

What’s the best piece of advice you ever received?
“If you do build a great experience, customers tell each other about that. Word of mouth is very powerful.” – Jeff Bezos

Who inspires you?
Hawker Uncle and Aunties are our Hawker Heroes. Most of the stalls are family-run businesses. The dedication and hard-work that they put in is commendable. They come to the hawker centre at 3am to start preparing food for the day and leave only in the evening after cleaning and washing everything.

What have you just learnt recently that blew you away?
We are leaning so much about our hawker partners through our #HawkersOfSG series, inspired by #HumansOfNewYork. For example, one of our hawker partners was into advertising (until the 2008 recession started, after which he started one of the most popular hawker stalls in the country) while the other used to sell and ride Harley Davidson bikes (and now sells black pepper rice bowls). Their stories and how they turned into our Hawker Heroes continues to inspire us and blow us away.

If you had your time again, what would you do differently?
I think I haven’t reached that stage in life yet where I look back and want to do things differently.

How do you unwind?
Watching and playing football 🙂

Favourite Asian destination for relaxation? Why?
Bali, definitely. One of the most beautiful and chill places.

Everyone in business should read this book:
Zero to One by Peter Thiel

Shameless plug for your business:
Cheapest and largest Hawker Food delivery in Singapore.

How can people connect with you?
On whatsapp at 90268776 or email at [email protected]

Twitter handle?
We’re on Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/whyqsg/ and Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/whyqsg/

This interview is part of the ‘Callum Connect’ series of more than 500 interviews

Callum Laing is an entrepreneur and investor based in Singapore. He has previously started,
built and sold half a dozen businesses and is now a Partner at Unity-Group Private Equity and Co-Founder of The Marketing Group PLC. He is the author two best selling books ‘Progressive Partnerships’ and ‘Agglomerate’.

Connect with Callum here:
twitter.com/laingcallum
linkedin.com/in/callumlaing
Download free copies of his books here: www.callumlaing.com

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