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The Key to Creating Intrinsic Value in Business



Value creation is the essence of business. Value is what attracts and keeps customers. Value is what attracts and retains employees. It’s also what attracts and maintains relationships with investors, suppliers, distributors and the wide range of other stakeholders who are critical to the firm’s long-term success.

A business that does not create value will eventually fail.

How to Create Value as a Means to an End

To know how to create value in business, it’s helpful to understand what it is. It may seem a simple matter, but it is actually a topic that philosophers have debated for millennia. For many business people, value roughly translates into price, the amount someone else is willing to give us in the marketplace, in exchange for our good or service. This is the notion of “exchange value” and it is the secret sauce of supply and demand and what makes a market whir.

Economists also talk about a slightly different notion of value, which is its “use value,” or utility.  Here, we’re talking about how valuable something is to me. It’s not the exchange value that you and I both agree on, but how much use I as an individual get out of particular product or service. Our different perspectives or circumstances might well result in wildly diverging valuations for the very same thing.

Use value and exchange value are critical things to get right when you’re running a business. If you don’t know how to assess the use value, or utility, of a particular technology, process, or even of a person, you are going to misunderstand how they fit into the overall value-creation process of your firm. If you don’t know how to properly assess the exchange value of your resulting goods and services, you will fail to read the market, and falter in marketing and sales.

Use value and exchange value undergird modern economics and our understanding of the way business works. They are also both examples of a broader notion of value called “instrumental value,” which is to say value, as a means to some other end. With use value, a machine or a person is as a means to create products and services. With exchange value, those products and services are a means to earning money.

If you’re getting the instrumental value of the inputs or the outputs of your business wrong, you’re probably not going to be in business over the long-haul. There is a class of businesses, however, that work with instrumental values, while also keeping an eye on another type of value.

How to Create Value as an End in Itself

While instrumental value is a means to some other end, “intrinsic value” is a fundamental consequence of something’s very existence.

Intrinsic value is not the kind of topic you find most economists spending their days contemplating. Although value investors use the term in a specific sense, the kind of intrinsic value I’m talking about is more the domain of philosophers, spiritualist, psychologists and anthropologists, musicians and artists.

Every once in a while though, you will bump into a business person who seems to operate in this field of intrinsic value creation. You tend to find them in those businesses that focus obsessively on quality or on design. You can also see their telltale marks in firms that seem to pay inordinate attention to how their products and services are actually being used by customers – not just whether those customers are satisfied with them, but whether they are successful with them.

Creating Intrinsic Value for Customers

From a customer perspective, we all know that there are some products whose value extends far beyond mere economic calculation. It might be our child’s teddy bear, our wedding ring, or a book whose message or story touched us deeply. The same is true, of course, with services. It might be an ambulance driver going above and beyond the call of duty, a sympathetic person at an airline call center during a family emergency, or a college professor who changed the direction of your life.

For these people, and in some cases, the organizations behind them, the product or service is not just a means to make money. These offerings have intrinsic value in themselves. In other words, with this rare breed of business, the object of production and the act of service create meaning through the ways in which customers interact with them.

One might say that these products and services have a certain something, a quintessence, that cuts to the essence of their value proposition, channeling a kind of invisible, intrinsic value to their users.

Every time a child hugs a teddy bear as she nods off to sleep at night, value and meaning are created. That value isn’t captured in the books of the teddy bear manufacturer, designer or retailer, but it is there, quietly accruing in thousands of little beds throughout the world, invisible to the calculations of the economist.

Creating Intrinsic Value for Employees

As important as these myriad sources of uncalculated value truly are, it still undervalues the full intrinsic value creation of most firms. This hidden component of value centers on the meaning we create through our work.

For every kid whose life takes a change for the positive as the result of some professor’s extra little bit of attention, there is a teacher who derived some sense of purpose from trying to make a difference. For every beautifully designed car, there is a team of designers who gained a wonderful sense of meaning from getting that one right. In some of these cases, there may be financial rewards associated with these employees’ extra effort, but that’s not the reason they do it. As author Dan Pink explains so wonderfully in “Drive,” they do it for reasons that go far beyond rational economic considerations. They do it for a sense of “autonomy, mastery and purpose.”

In other words, part of the reason we go the extra mile in our work centers on a type of value that goes beyond our traditional notions of economic exchange.

There is something tremendously powerful about our drive for meaning. When we find meaning in our work, it can act as a powerful aphrodisiac, an injection of inspiration capable of getting us through the most trying of times. It might be the firefighter who has seen her work translated into a saved life. It might be an engineer whose solar panel design single-handedly resorts in the reduction of millions of pounds of carbon that might otherwise be dumped into our atmosphere. Or it might be that teacher who has seen the effect his connections with students can have on the long-term direction of their lives.

For these people, work is not simply a means to a paycheck. For these people, work creates value through helping them to create meaning of their lives. It is what enables them to be of service to the world and the company’s that offer this type of work create a powerful attractor for the best and brightest employees.

Meaning, Mission and Value Creation in Business

Businesses that know how to engage this quintessential quality of intrinsic value creation have a huge advantage over firms that wield purely instrumental notions of value creation.

Firms that create intrinsic value through meaning face a kind of paradox. That meaning and purpose, that desire to serve a mission, is what creates economic value for the firm. It’s what brings people to work and what draws customers in. No mission, no money. And yet, missions are ultimately dependent upon the firm’s ability to generate revenues. No money, no mission.

Managing this paradox of value creation requires that firms get a much deeper understanding of the nature of the value they create – both value as a means to money and as an end in itself. Businesses that know how to master the tension between instrumental and intrinsic value creation are businesses that know how to translate meaning into money.

These are the truly great mission-driven companies, the ones that attract and engage us the deepest.


About the Author

This article was written by Gideon Rosenblatt of The Vital Edge. Gideon ran an innovative social enterprise called Groundwire for nine years. He worked at Microsoft for ten years in marketing and product development, and created CarPoint, one of the world’s first large-scale e-commerce websites in 1996. The Vital Edge explores the human experience in an era of machine intelligence.


Women on Top in Tech – Dr. Sanna Gaspard, Founder and CEO of Rubitection



(Women on Top in Tech is a series about Women Founders, CEOs, and Leaders in technology. It aims to amplify and bring to the fore diversity in leadership in technology.)

Dr. Sanna Gaspard is the Founder and CEO of Rubitection, a medical device start-up developing a diagnostic tool for early stage pressure detection, assessment, and management. She is an Entrepreneur, inventor, and biomedical engineer with a passion for innovation, entrepreneurship, healthcare and medical devices. She has received recognition and awards including being selected as a finalist for the Cartier Women’s Initiative Awards(’13), a semi-finalist for the Big C competition (’14), a finalist for the Mass Challenge Business accelerator in Boston, and taking 1st place at the 3 Rivers Investment Venture Fair’s Technology showcase (‘11). Her vision is to make the Rubitect Assessment System the global standard solution for early bedsore detection and management.

What makes you do what you do? 
I am driven to have impact and improve healthcare as I have a strong drive to problem solve, comes up with new ideas, and see them come to life.

How did you rise in the industry you are in? 
I first focused on getting the educational background and then I pursued the goals I have for myself. I got my PhD in Biomedical Engineering with a specialization in medical device development. Having the educational background is important as a woman and minority to assist people in taking your seriously.  After completing my PhD, I focused on bringing my invention for a medical device for early bedsore detection and prevention called the Rubitect Assessment System to market to help save lives and improve care.

Why did you take on this role/start this startup especially since this is perhaps a stretch or challenge for you (or viewed as one since you are not the usual leadership demographics)?
I started my startup, Rubitection , because I felt it was the best way to bring the technology to market. I knew that if I did not try to commercialize the technology, it would not make it to the doctors and nurses. I also have confidence that I could manage developing the technology since I had taken classes on entrepreneurship and had my PhD in biomedical engineering with a specialization in medical devices.

Do you have a mentor that you look up to in your industries or did you look for one or how did that work? How did you make a match if you did, and how did you end up being mentored by him/her?
No, I don’t have a specific mentor in my field. I am looking for one at the moment. However, I do look up to Steve Jobs and Oprah as examples of how one can start with nothing and work their way up and build a successful, global, and reputable business and brand.

Now as a leader how do you spot, develop, keep, grow and support your talent?  
I first try to find people who have fundamental technical or work experience to be competent to complete the work. I then evaluate the person for intangible skills like independent thinking, reliability, leadership, resilience, organizational skills, strong work ethic, open mindedness/flexibility, and good communication skills.

Do you consciously or unconsciously support diversity and why? 
I consciously make an effort as a minority woman in tech, I intimately understand the need to promote diversity within my business and outside my business. I first hire the best people for the job and also make a point to hire women and minorities qualified for the position.

What is your take on what it takes to be a great leader in your industry and as a general rule of thumb?  
It takes resilience, vision, being a team player, an ability to inspire others and delegate work, knowing your weakness, and knowing when to put your business or yourself first.

Advice for others?
My advice to others is to take calculated risks, pursue every opportunity, surround yourself with supporters, build your team with smart dedicated people, and stay focused on your vision. I am striving to implement this advice myself as I work towards commercializing my technology for early bedsore detection, grow my team, and recruit clinical partners to address an $11 billion US healthcare problem which affects millions around the world.

If anyone is interested in learning more about our work or company, please contact us at [email protected].

To learn more about Dr. Sanna Gaspard, CEO of Rubitection visit:

If you’d like to get in touch with Dr. Sanna Gaspard, please feel free to reach out to her on LinkedIn:

To learn more about Rubitection, please click here.

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Women on Top in Tech – Suzanne Wisse-Huiskes, Founder of MatchBox Consultancy and an Advocate at the Global Tech Advocates Network



(Women on Top in Tech is a series about Women Founders, CEOs, and Leaders in technology. It aims to amplify and bring to the fore diversity in leadership in technology.)

Suzanne Wisse-Huiskes is a Strategic Consultant and Founder at MatchBox Consultancy with offices in the United Kingdom and Nigeria. MatchBox provides expert advise in Impact Investing, Alternative Finance, Venture Capital, Fundraising, Women Leadership, Business Development, and Economic Empowerment. She is also an Advocate at the Global Tech Advocates Network. Dedicated to challenging talented entrepreneurs, Suzanne is an official mentor at startup/accelerator programs in Africa, Europe, and Asia. She was awarded top 400 most successful women in the Netherlands for two years in a row.

What makes you do what you do?
My drive is to enable entrepreneurs to grow their businesses by improving their access to funding. This can elevate an entire community. I believe that Alternative Finance can potentially be a powerful catalyst for shifting the way our financial markets work.

I love the ingredients of the alternative finance market: the innovative nature of the industry; the global playing field; the turbo speed of change. The market is booming and shows little sign of slowing down.

I founded MatchBox to support highly motivated entrepreneurs and investors in their mission to create profitable businesses with impact. MatchBox has become a trusted partner to these clients: they value our strategic and operational expertise, as well as our strong global network used to consult and connect. The requests vary from developing large investing programs to ensure access to capital for SME’s, to developing funding strategies for entrepreneurs. What works in one country may not work in others. We understand the local players and the local markets. This work is fully aligned with what is important to me.

How did you rise in the industry you are in?
I’ve been in the crowdfunding industry since 2008. Back then, Facebook only had a 100 million active users as opposed to the 2.000 million users today. Kickstarter, one of the world’s largest funding platforms, was yet to launch. Joining the industry that early in the game, allowed me to rise with it. I was fortunate to be part of initiatives that pushed the Alternative Finance ecosystem, first in Amsterdam, then on a broader European level.

Then later on other emerging markets began to interest me. I moved to Nigeria, to work in Africa’s fastest growing economy and home to exciting trends in capital and fintech. I familiarized myself with the investing ecosystems in African countries. Today, I work in alternative finance ecosystems in Asia, Africa and Europe. Being able to learn, share and compare best practices from different economies to me is key in the rise of the industry. Currently, the crowdfunding market in Asia alone is worth over 200 billion Euros. That’s huge!

Why did you take on this role/start this startup especially since this is perhaps a stretch or challenge for you (or viewed as one since you are not the usual leadership demographics)?
I’ve always followed my heart in my professional life. I focus on work that I am passionate about and am not afraid to take the path less travelled. So leadership, demographics never held me back. With my experience and skills I am well positioned to successfully get the job done. For me it doesn’t feel like it’s a stretch.

Even more so, my clients see it as a big advantage to have women on the job. I recently worked on an impact investing program in West Africa focussing on women-led SME’s and experienced the benefits of a diverse team. Women entrepreneurs see the world through a different lens and, in turn, do things differently.

Do you have a mentor that you look up to in your industries or did you look for one or how did that work? How did you make a match if you did, and how did you end up being mentored by him/her?
The industry was completely new when I started, with no seniors to learn from. As a strong believer in mentorship, I do reach out to people in other industries for feedback and to bounce ideas.

I also learn a lot from working with various entrepreneurs. Collaborating with Sir Richard Branson in the beginning of my career was encouraging. We did a successful Crowdfunding Campaign for the elephants in Botswana. But I’m equally impressed by entrepreneurs that make a huge impact on their community no matter the circumstances. I’ve seen exceptional people grow businesses in the poorest regions of Nigeria. One can only admire their leadership.

Now as a leader how do you spot, develop, keep, grow and support your talent?
For me, mentoring young entrepreneurs is a great way to develop and grow talent. My focus is usually on two mentees at a time to ensure there is enough time to discuss ideas and challenges. I worked at fintech startups for almost 10 years before founding MatchBox. So there are plenty of stories to share and learn from, both on failures as well as on successes.

Do you consciously or unconsciously support diversity and why?
I’m very vocal on the need for diversity. I’ve always found myself in the male dominated groups. First at University, then in my first corporate position, and later as a Board Member. At some of my MBA Finance classes, I was the only woman in a room of 50 men. It never bothered or intimidated me. It just made me work a little harder.

Nonetheless, diversity is much needed. I strongly believe the industry is missing out on many brilliant women. That is why I dedicate a great deal of time mentoring female entrepreneurs. We discuss the tools their businesses require to grow and attract the right type of capital. Investors still have a different approach towards female founders. This year, we are launching an initiative called ‘the Republic of Female Founders’, to provide practical tools and guidelines that are specific for this group.

What is your take on what it takes to be a great leader in your industry and as a general rule of thumb?
My general rule of thumb: If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together. For me, it’s all about collaborative leadership. My industry is becoming increasingly complex, so sharing best practices will bring us far. That’s why I became an Advocate of the Tech Shanghai Advocates, part of the Global Tech Advocates. This group of senior leaders in the tech community is created to champion and accelerate the growth of the local technology sector.

I am also a fan of the CrowdfundingHub and Crowddialog in Europe, and Ingressive in Africa for similar reasons: Ordinary people doing extraordinary things because they believe in the positive impact of innovation in finance. My peers are all trailblazers in the alternative finance industry, I consider myself to be in great company.

Advice for others?
I strongly believe in collaboration, so building business relationships is key. I truly foster my relations. To me it doesn’t feel like work, but rather like building bonds. Seek opportunities to connect and reach out. It really pays off to have a strong network. At MatchBox, I work with a network of exceptional local experts. If you need advice and consulting on your funding strategy, impact investing program or crowdfunding strategy, we will gladly work with you. Contact us at MatchBox.

If you’d like to get in touch with Suzanne Wisse – Huiskes, please feel free to reach out to her on LinkedIn:

To learn more about MatchBox Consultancy, please click here.

To learn more about  Global Tech Advocates Network, please click here.

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