Mycal Anders is a prominent Crossfit figure who changes lives by exposing people to their true potential, physically, spiritually, and mentally. Owning several companies such as Crossfit Phx and CryoPhx, Mycal believes that through the medium of fitness we can strive to eliminate the excuses we tell ourselves so that we are able to live a life that is as positive and productive as possible. 

What led you to create your current business? 

I got tired of being held in the same esteem as my peers who, in  a lot of cases, were not performing with the same expectation of excellence. Furthermore, the lack of education and application is something that is plaguing the industry, and I wanted to take control of the process by creating a staff of the best fitness professionals through education and emersion through practical application.

Could you give us what your process of developing your business to success was? 

I read a lot of books. I spent a lot of time working on myself, becoming more aware of my true strengths and desires. After 4 years active duty in the Marine Corps, I was equipped with the leadership tools and self-discipline to pursue this entrepreneurial journey. My goal was not to train athletes and elite performers specifically. My intent is to develop a system and a protocol that will allow us to train EVERYONE in the same manner we train those elite performers.

Did you encounter any particular difficulties in the beginning? 

I think that is what being an entrepreneur is; solving problems. Some of the difficulties I’ve had to overcome was learning the application of doing business. Coming to the realization that once you open your business, you’re at the top of the ladder, and thus personally responsible for the success or failure of your plan. I have been evicted twice. I have been sued by previous partners. I have lived off the “Dollar Menu” at McDonald’s due to the inability to afford anything else. I spent ten months on an outpost in Afghanistan. I spent the better part of 7 years listening to people telling me that my dream was not a profitable one, and that I should I should reset my goals for things that were more sustainable and safer. All the while I kept my eye on my goals, shifted gears, altered course as needed, and made every effort to surround myself with positive inspiring mentors who showed me that all those things were indeed part of the process. As one mentor put it, “The Universe will test your conviction, often and as necessary.”

What is your long term plan? 

My long term plan is to create a facility that is not only conducive to the facilitation of fitness of the general population, but also where aspiring trainers and coaches can come and safely cut their teeth in the industry. In doing so, we will create a culture where the standard of excellence is raised. Professionals will graduate from our facility and be not only educated, but equipped to provide the best quality service available to each and every one of their clients and athletes. I want to establish a “one-stop shop” for performance where our clients need not outsource a single service. They have everything they need from fitness, to nutrition, to recovery, at their finger tips. 

Could you share with us some Fitness industry insights? 

As the consumer becomes more educated, and access to information becomes more readily available, it is even more important in this day and age that we bring our A-Game each and everyday. That means keeping ourselves abreast of the latest and greatest in training methodology, more so in what is good practice than being researched, as studies tend to lag behind application in many cases. If you are not passionate about what you do, it will indeed show up in your work and ultimately the results. We as fitness professionals must get away from the notion that we are only show in town and that market share is limited. To include the conglomarates that are 24 Hour and LA Fitness, there is only so much sustainable capacity. Therefore, it is simply putting forth the best quality product and service possible, day in and day out by being overly selective in your staff, focusing on your community, and collaborating with as many professionals as possible.

What are some important lessons you’ve learned about entrepreneurship? 

No matter the industry, ultimately we are in the business of people. Without the ability to develop relationships you will fail. You can never be equipped with too much knowledge. Purposely putting yourself in the presence of those with more experience and time in the game, actively listening and learning from the mistakes they’ve already made, will make your road a lot easier.

Any tips for achieving success?

a: Take Pride in What You Do

b: Their Are No Off Days

c: EVERY Relationship is Meaningful

d: Systems and the Implementation of Automation Is Key

e: Duplicate Yourself to Maximize Your Output

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